The 1 Question You Need To Answer to Know if Pet Insurance is Worth It Or Not


Pet insurance: is it a waste of money or a life-saver?

If you asked veterinarians, they’ll tell you the findings of a recent study that show a pet is nearly 4x more likely to survive an emergency medical situation if the pet parents have insurance to bear the unexpected financial burden. Sadly, many dog owners are forced to euthanize a pup in emergency situations, if they can’t afford the care.

In our view, here’s the most important question you need to answer is this: Do you have $5,000 set aside for your pet’s emergency care?

If you do not, you may find yourself in the horrific situation that many pet owners have encountered: the decision about whether to euthanize your pet, or go deep into debt to cover their care. For some, debt may not even be an option. For others, it will come with the cost of a very high interest rate.

Many suggest that instead of paying into insurance, you can simply set aside the money every month in a savings account. While this can work for some, keep in mind that in the early days your savings account will be unable to cover the cost of most pet emergencies.

For most, the decision about whether to invest in pet insurance comes down to peace of mind. If you’d rather not worry about the future possibility of expensive care, pet insurance can be relatively small price to pay, especially if your dog is young.

The Easiest Way to Compare Pet Insurance Quotes, Without Having to Visit Dozens of Insurer’s Websites

iHeartDogs created a simple tool that pulls quote from all the major insurers, allowing you to see which company best meets your dog’s needs and your budget. It’s a compeltely free serivice, just enter your dog’s age, breed, zip code and email for a instant no-obligation quote from the major insurers

 

Gastrointestinal, Vomiting, & Diarrhea
food bloat
gastroenteritis
intestinal obstruction with surgery
pancreatitis
stomach ‘bloat’ (GDV)
$700 – $2,000
$750 – $3,000
$2,000 – $4,000
$1,000 – $5,000

$3,000 – $8,000
Poisons / Toxic Ingestion:
antifreeze
chocolate
grapes / raisins
human antidepressant medications
human pain medications
rat poison
slug bait
xylitol
$2,000 to $6,000
$250 to $2,000
$2,000 to $5,000
$1,500 to $2,500
$250 to $2,000
$750 to $4,000
$1,500 to $4,000
$750 to $4,000
Injuries & Trauma:
cat bite abscess
dog bite wounds
electrical cord shock
heat stroke
hit-by-car
$250 to $1,500
$1,000 to $10,000
$500 to $3,000
$1,500 to $6,000
$250 to $8,000
Urinary Issues:
urinary tract obstruction  $1,000 – $3,000





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